Our Child of the Stars on sale in US and Canada !!

Having won rave reviews in the UK, Our Child of the Stars hits the US and Canada on 3rd March. Available as hardback, the three e-book formats, and audiobook! (BTW if your local shop doesn’t stock it, they can order it.)

The LA Times loved it

“It’s 1969, the year of the moon landings, Woodstock and the ongoing Vietnam war. Against this backdrop, Gene and Molly Myers have been having a rough time since their child died some years before. [When] a meteor strikes their New England town… Molly is given the task of caring for the gravely ill survivor – an alien child called Cory.

Cory’s difference to others highlights the real messages that have been tenderly provided here – those of acceptance, warmth of human spirit along with parental love and sacrifice. It’s a wonderfully emotional, heart-warming journey of what it really means to be a parent and a reminder that at times it feels like society as a whole hasn’t really become any more accepting of those who are different since the 1960s.”

Edited for spoilers

UK praise here

Buying links here

IndieBound finds independent bookshops

Barnes and Noble HB

B+N Nook

Indigo Canada

Amazon

 

A million pounds or a million readers?

A genie offers a writer a choice.  Would they rather have a million pounds, or a million people read their first book but for no money at all?

It’s an interesting question.  Do we write to be able to keep writing, or do we write because we want to share the story?

To write solely for financial security is a mugs game.

If you have faith in your book, a million people reading it will produce enthusiasts.  Say 5% of people who read it become fans. (By which I mean only someone who is super likely to buy your next book.)  50,000 fans is an excellent base for a career, you might become established.

Conversely, a million pounds frees you to do only that work you want to do.

Of course, in the real world you are not offered this choice.

This was prompted by news that my publisher has remaindered some of my paperbacks to The Works, a company which runs 450 discount shops across the country.  You can currently buy a copy of Our Child of the Stars at £2, less than a coffee.  Three books for a fiver.

It’s a common sense move to shift copies you won’t sell otherwise. I hope the Works sell all these copies to build fans of my work.

Many people think this is the devil, and that my publisher should burn unsold copies in their furnaces. Many book people want to go back to prices fixed by the publisher.  Another debate for another time.

When you look behind this, there are other considerations.

For example, WH Smiths, the Works, and the supermarkets can reach people who rarely use bookshops.